I'm Laala and I'm 24 years old. This is mostly a book blog, but I also occasionally document my life.
My other tumblrs: Discourse on Life | A Burst of Colour | One Door to Another.
My goodreads profile | Flickr | last.fm | YouTube | Instagram.
You can reach me at distantheartbeats@gmail.com.
[2009: Books | Movies | Concerts | Theatre] [2010: Books | Movies | Concerts | Theatre]
[2011: Books | Movies | Concerts | Theatre] [2012: Books | Movies | Concerts & Theatre]
~ Thursday, July 24 ~
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I was training last night with my brother (Muay Thai) and he was teaching me that I needed to be able to go around him in circles. As we were training, I started to turn and began yelling “PIVOT! PIVOT! PIVOT!” He stared at me for a second, trying to decide between telling me off for not being serious during training and wanting to laugh himself. I raised my eyebrow at him and he said, “shut up. SHUT UP, SHUT UP!”

I was training last night with my brother (Muay Thai) and he was teaching me that I needed to be able to go around him in circles. As we were training, I started to turn and began yelling “PIVOT! PIVOT! PIVOT!” He stared at me for a second, trying to decide between telling me off for not being serious during training and wanting to laugh himself. I raised my eyebrow at him and he said, “shut up. SHUT UP, SHUT UP!”

(Source: goodnightandg00dbye)

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reblogged via liamdryden
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And maybe — maybe — love will arrive, and remain. That could happen. There’s no obvious reason for love’s skittishness (though there is as well no obvious reason for the behaviour of neutrons). It’s all about patience. Isn’t it? Patience, and the refusal to abandon hope.
— Michael Cunningham, The Snow Queen
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~ Tuesday, July 22 ~
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Anonymous said: I've been following your blog for a number of years, and it's one of my lasting favorites. You have a wonderful taste in books and music.

Thank you :)

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I made macaroons for the first time a couple of nights ago. Never buying them again! (Unless I’m in Paris. Paris is always the exception.)

I made macaroons for the first time a couple of nights ago. Never buying them again! (Unless I’m in Paris. Paris is always the exception.)

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reblogged via ahhmmmburr
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As it turned out, the mortally ill can be rendered more, rather than less, irritating by the authority impending demise confers upon them. Who knew?
— Michael Cunningham, The Snow Queen
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I rolled over, but you’d gone.
Laala Kashef AlghataSix Word Stories #10
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~ Monday, July 21 ~
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It’s enough. It’s just not what was expected of him, by way of a life’s work. But really, what could be more depressing than delivering to one’s audience the anticipated outcome?
— Michael Cunningham, The Snow Queen
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~ Sunday, July 20 ~
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First of all, the country as a whole does not do that, radical groups within it do. Secondly, you have absolutely no idea how much that does or does not exist. Finally, you would have to separate how much of that is a direct result of a people being brutally oppressed and thus being put into a position where they radicalise because it seems necessary (whether or not it is, for the moment, is beside the point).
Besides, if you imagine that same situation anywhere else in the world that would not even be something that is pointed out in the middle of a war. So in the UK we have the BNP, who are a bunch of raving idiots. Does that mean the UK should not be able to lead its own government or have its people living in safety? Does it mean that its citizens and residents don’t have the right to enjoy a state of peace and not worry that they may be killed at any second? In the US, there has been a long history of idiots — starting with slavery, the KKK, and now the Tea Party. All those are extremists. Again, does that mean the US should suddenly be invaded, not recognised as a country, and not left to sort out its own affairs?
This entire comment just baffles me. You think that oppression you have been conditioned to believe exists in large numbers is somehow more important than the fact that hundreds of people have died in less than two weeks?

First of all, the country as a whole does not do that, radical groups within it do. Secondly, you have absolutely no idea how much that does or does not exist. Finally, you would have to separate how much of that is a direct result of a people being brutally oppressed and thus being put into a position where they radicalise because it seems necessary (whether or not it is, for the moment, is beside the point).

Besides, if you imagine that same situation anywhere else in the world that would not even be something that is pointed out in the middle of a war. So in the UK we have the BNP, who are a bunch of raving idiots. Does that mean the UK should not be able to lead its own government or have its people living in safety? Does it mean that its citizens and residents don’t have the right to enjoy a state of peace and not worry that they may be killed at any second? In the US, there has been a long history of idiots — starting with slavery, the KKK, and now the Tea Party. All those are extremists. Again, does that mean the US should suddenly be invaded, not recognised as a country, and not left to sort out its own affairs?

This entire comment just baffles me. You think that oppression you have been conditioned to believe exists in large numbers is somehow more important than the fact that hundreds of people have died in less than two weeks?

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The image above is by Israeli artist Amir Schiby, paying tribute to the four Palestinian boys (Ahed Atef Bakr, Zakaria Ahed Bakr, Mohamed Ramez Bakr and Ismael Mohamed Bakr) who died playing football on the beach during one of the air strikes. He wrote on Facebook that the image was created “as a tribute to *all* children living in war zones.”
The reaction from Cameron and Obama in the wake of Israel’s brutal assault on Gaza has been disgusting. According to The Guardian, a No. 10 spokeswoman said that “both leaders reiterated their support for Israel’s right to take proportionate action to defend itself from the barrage of rocket attacks from Gaza”. Obama was especially callous as he stood at a White House iftar, supposedly held to encourage interfaith dialogue, and reiterated that statement.
I don’t often write about politics on this blog, mostly because I work hard to be informed and am not always aware to what extent I am. Occasionally there are crucial bits of information missing and sometimes the only information you can get comes from sources so biased it’s hard to separate the truth from the propaganda. However. In this case, while the history of the conflict is long and complicated, this particular assault is not.
I want to be absolutely clear about this: Israel’s current unrelenting and bloody attack on Gaza is not “proportionate action”. It is tantamount to genocide. 
Genocide /ˈdʒɛnəsʌɪd/, noun: the deliberate killing of a large group of people, especially those of a particular nation or ethnic group.
Over 350 Palestinian deaths. Five soldiers and two civilians in Israel. Israel have the Iron Dome, which means most Hamas rockets (which are less precise and deadly than their Israeli counterparts at any rate) do not reach Israel. 
I have a couple of Israeli friends on Facebook, and yesterday I was shocked when one of them posted pictures of himself on the beach with his friends. The caption said something about a “hot summer” that was “lots of fun”. There was another photo with a surfboard and a comment on the waves. He’s not a bad person. But it goes to show how dramatically different the quality of life is on the two sides of the border. 
A note: it infuriates me that I have to point this out, but being against the terrible atrocities that the state of Israel commits and being anti-Semitic is not the same thing. Anyone who decides they want to accuse me of being anti-Jewish can kindly take their ridiculous mentality elsewhere. It is precisely that kind of narrow-minded thinking that perpetuates these violent actions because it makes people too afraid to speak up.

The image above is by Israeli artist Amir Schiby, paying tribute to the four Palestinian boys (Ahed Atef Bakr, Zakaria Ahed Bakr, Mohamed Ramez Bakr and Ismael Mohamed Bakr) who died playing football on the beach during one of the air strikes. He wrote on Facebook that the image was created “as a tribute to *all* children living in war zones.”

The reaction from Cameron and Obama in the wake of Israel’s brutal assault on Gaza has been disgusting. According to The Guardian, a No. 10 spokeswoman said that “both leaders reiterated their support for Israel’s right to take proportionate action to defend itself from the barrage of rocket attacks from Gaza”. Obama was especially callous as he stood at a White House iftar, supposedly held to encourage interfaith dialogue, and reiterated that statement.

I don’t often write about politics on this blog, mostly because I work hard to be informed and am not always aware to what extent I am. Occasionally there are crucial bits of information missing and sometimes the only information you can get comes from sources so biased it’s hard to separate the truth from the propaganda. However. In this case, while the history of the conflict is long and complicated, this particular assault is not.

I want to be absolutely clear about this: Israel’s current unrelenting and bloody attack on Gaza is not “proportionate action”. It is tantamount to genocide. 

Genocide /ˈdʒɛnəsʌɪd/, noun: the deliberate killing of a large group of people, especially those of a particular nation or ethnic group.

Over 350 Palestinian deaths. Five soldiers and two civilians in Israel. Israel have the Iron Dome, which means most Hamas rockets (which are less precise and deadly than their Israeli counterparts at any rate) do not reach Israel. 

I have a couple of Israeli friends on Facebook, and yesterday I was shocked when one of them posted pictures of himself on the beach with his friends. The caption said something about a “hot summer” that was “lots of fun”. There was another photo with a surfboard and a comment on the waves. He’s not a bad person. But it goes to show how dramatically different the quality of life is on the two sides of the border. 

A note: it infuriates me that I have to point this out, but being against the terrible atrocities that the state of Israel commits and being anti-Semitic is not the same thing. Anyone who decides they want to accuse me of being anti-Jewish can kindly take their ridiculous mentality elsewhere. It is precisely that kind of narrow-minded thinking that perpetuates these violent actions because it makes people too afraid to speak up.

63 notes  ()